Local sites/routes for beginners

Info about where to crash. Also the place to post details of routes, GPS tracks, etc.

Moderator: Moderators

Post Reply
User avatar
Graham_U
surf god
surf god
Posts: 981
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2004 10:08
Location: Nth.Wiltshire

Local sites/routes for beginners

Post by Graham_U » Sat Aug 09, 2008 12:21

OK I know I'm going to regret this but now I have the bike I suppose I better try to use it. Has anyone got any suggestions for places (and where I can find info on them) that are local that are not to testing for rider or bike. Remember I don't mind going up hill but will wimp out on any thing silly on the down hill. Bike is supposed to be a reasonable entry level standard, but won't take a hammering.

Also what sort of tool kit/spares do people take with them? Given the amount you lot spend on your bikes its worrying the amount of things that seem to break.

Also looking for somewhere to take Val which would have to be somewhere best defined as gentle. Both her and her bike will not be up to anything are all testing.
Graham

User avatar
Ian Long
surf god
surf god
Posts: 862
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2004 17:36
Location: Chew Valley
Contact:

Post by Ian Long » Mon Aug 11, 2008 07:04

While not particularly local for you, Ashton Court is a great place with only gentle gradients and a whole range of trails. Most of them go through the woods around the edge of the Ashton Court estate.

Further still but very convenient for Neroli and I is the circuit round the edge of Black Down on the top of the Mendips - this is where a large portion of the Nomadic MTBers learnt to ride.

Closer to you, there is a farm that has set up a trail round the edge of his fields. It isn't the most interesting of rides but would be a good place to start - alas you have to pay to ride it, Spirthill Trail

Also good for you would be sections of the Ridgeway, you have a vast choice of trail to ride, most of which is wide and travelling along the ridge itself, although there are plenty of options to drop down of the ridge when you wish to get more adventerous.

Would be more than willing to provide a gentle introduction to any of these on an evening during the week.

With regard to spares - puncture repair kit, 2-3 spare inner tubes, Camel back with 2-3lt water, pump, first aid kit, map (alas rarely of the current location 8) ), compass, multi tool, SRAM speed link & chain tool if there isn't one on the multi tool. Torch during the winter
If found, please return to the pub.

NigelP
surf god
surf god
Posts: 650
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 14:35
Location: North of Bristol

Post by NigelP » Tue Aug 12, 2008 17:22

I carry two sets of tools around: one very sensible set to fix most problems and then a second pack, added after our experience of being lost in Afan forest.

The basic set is water, spare tyre, instant patches, proper glued patches and sand paper, multi-tool (including tyre levers & chain breaker), two SRAM speed links, pump, money and mobile phone.

As we have ventured further afield, where a self rescue is the order of the day I added: GPS, rear mech hanger (highly recommended and proprietary to each bike frame), space blanket, compass, mini light, food, another inner tube, short length of duct tape, small medical kit, plastic ties and a patch for a blown out tyre. I have used them all except the light and the space blanket.

Also add a Camelback to carry it all!

There are some excellent rides around the Forest of Dean, including a delightful sculpture trail.
Windsurfers do it standing at the bar

User avatar
Viv Powell
wave jumper
wave jumper
Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2004 19:33
Location: East Bristol

Post by Viv Powell » Tue Aug 12, 2008 21:13

Agree with all of the above.

Add to all of that a range of different size cable ties, which are amazingly useful for all kinds of "mechanicals". Steve also carries a whistle!

Oh and at the moment a shock pump - at least until we get the new machines set up to our liking :wink:
Viv

User avatar
dro
surf god
surf god
Posts: 757
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2004 09:58
Location: south wales

Post by dro » Tue Aug 12, 2008 22:46

personally I find a dog quite useful even though she makes a dreadful mess inside the camelback.
What do you mean not ENOUGH wind ?

Val
beach starter
beach starter
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 23:00
Location: North Wilts

Post by Val » Wed Aug 27, 2008 20:26

Thanks for all the advice(?)

I'm feeling less and less sure about this mularkey the more I read. The amount of kit needed when you go out seems horrendous - luckily our forays out so far have been along bridleways within walking distance of home. I'm intrigued by the dog. The nearest we have to an equivalent is one of next door's cats and I'm not sure that they would be such good company. Do you rent her out Huw??

User avatar
MartinF
surf god
surf god
Posts: 1023
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2004 10:06
Location: N of Bristol. Prob in the pub
Contact:

Post by MartinF » Wed Aug 27, 2008 22:14

Everything in proportion, Val: If you're not going to be venturing far from home, a pump and a few self-adhesive patches ought to be enough. A couple of tyre levers might be handy, too.

Trouble is, on a new bike, it's never set up quite right, and the time you find this is when you're out riding. And that's when you might need a few tools to change saddle position, alter shifter/brake lever positions and angles, etc. So a small multi-tool is highy recommended.

And if you're cycling as a couple - you don't both need to carry these things. One set between you is sufficent and spreads the burden.
It's an ill wind that never blows at all.

User avatar
dro
surf god
surf god
Posts: 757
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2004 09:58
Location: south wales

amazing

Post by dro » Thu Aug 28, 2008 15:43

To my astonishment Martin I completely agree with you.
What do you mean not ENOUGH wind ?

Post Reply